Friday, January 27, 2012

Medieval Make-A-Wish

Is it wrong that I'm insanely jealous of this boy's Make-A-Wish? Sure, he's got desmoid fibromatosis, but he's also got his own castle, flanked by folks from the New Hampshire Renaissance Faire and the Neville Companye. Check out the photo gallery to see just how cool it is.

Has anyone else noticed just how many medieval reenactors are involved in Scouting as well? I'm curious as to why that is. My gut impulse is to say they are drawn to the places where Scouting values coincide with chivalric values ("A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent.").

11 comments:

  1. Baden Powell and his American followers were big on chivalry right from the beginning.

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  3. The Rover Scouts make an interesting case for this, as they explicitly invoked an Arthurian metaphor for young adult scouting, as the Jungle Book had been used for Cub Scouts. Rovers referred to their meetings as "round tables" and often had new rovers stand vigils.

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  4. Beyond the Chivalric traits, Scouting is also an Order with a recognizable uniform that suggests honorable intentions. When people learn you made it to the highest rank, Eagle, you are automatically recognized as someone to be trusted and admired, often even before people get to know you. My brother once got a job interview just because they saw he was an Eagle Scout.

    It's like a form of heraldry. This can be seen on the badges of rank leading up to Eagle, which begin at the Scout rank with a simple fleur-de-lis.

    I could go on and on. There's a heavy emphasis on orientation. Scouts swear an Oath, to God and country. The ceremonies are mostly adapted from Masonic Rituals. There are even "secret" or "elite" orders like "The Order of the Arrow" or "The Order of the Fork."

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  5. Thanks a lot for sharing. You have done a brilliant job.

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  6. Thanks for the article. Very interesting.

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  7. My wife---and now I---lives in both these worlds because we love the outdoors. I think she also likes Beowulf's author and Tolkien because their love of nature and trees is obvious.

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